Geophysical Detection of Nuclear Proliferation

The Geophysical Detection of Nuclear Proliferation (GDNP) University Affiliated Research Center (UARC) was established to detect, locate, characterize, and assess the threat potential of nuclear activities worldwide through research, development, testing, and evaluation of scientific and technological capabilities.

The GDNP UARC was created to recognize the accomplishments and growing stature of nuclear treaty monitoring support programs at the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Establishment of the UARC provides the necessary structure, visibility and support to better serve our customers in nuclear treaty verification across the spectrum, from basic research to operations and maintenance. The UARC status also enables any US Government agency to quickly issue a sole-source contract (task order) that falls under its core mission of the geophysical detection of nuclear proliferation. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks was a natural choice to house the GDNP UARC owing to its long history of supporting the national technical means.

 

Core Competencies

Nuclear treaty verification

Geophysical measurement and signature intelligence

The GDNP UARC encompasses the Wilson Alaska Technical Center, which operates and maintains more than twenty infrasound and seismic arrays worldwide in support of nuclear proliferation monitoring. Additional GDNP UARC capabilities include seismic, acoustic and radionuclide sensing and analysis, including event forensics for yield estimation and characterization.

Located in the Geophysical Institute on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the GDNP UARC has access to specialized facilities for geophysical research, development, testing and evaluation (RDT&E) in acoustics and seismology, and also in high performance computation. These facilities support full-scale seismic and acoustic modeling, atmospheric transport modeling, signal processing, and data analysis. The GNDP UARC sports the Intelligence Community (IC) by providing theoretical and practical understanding of the techniques and technologies related to geophysical measurement and signatures (MASINT) and geospatial imagery (GEOINT).

Instrumentation and monitoring

Basic and applied geophysics research

Education

Theoretical and practical understanding of the techniques and technologies related to geophysical measurement and signatures (MASINT) and geospatial imagery (GEOINT).

Academic expertise includes the solid earth, atmosphere, cryosphere, oceans, remote sensing, unmanned aerial systems, and space.

Supporting DoD workforce development and training across the geophysical spectrum, through the college of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and the college of Engineering and Mines at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Nuclear treaty verification

 

The GDNP UARC encompasses the Wilson Alaska Technical Center, which operates and maintains more than twenty infrasound and seismic arrays worldwide in support of nuclear proliferation monitoring. Additional GDNP UARC capabilities include seismic, acoustic and radionuclide sensing and analysis, including event forensics for yield estimation and characterization.

CTBTO Logo with a white eye on blue background.

 

Geophysical measurement and signature intelligence

 

Located in the Geophysical Institute on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the GDNP UARC has access to specialized facilities for geophysical research, development, testing and evaluation (RDT&E) in acoustics and seismology, and also in high performance computation. These facilities support full-scale seismic and acoustic modeling, atmospheric transport modeling, signal processing, and data analysis. The GNDP UARC sports the Intelligence Community (IC) by providing theoretical and practical understanding of the techniques and technologies related to geophysical measurement and signatures (MASINT) and geospatial imagery (GEOINT).

 

Instrumentation and monitoring

 

Theoretical and practical understanding of the techniques and technologies related to geophysical measurement and signatures (MASINT) and geospatial imagery (GEOINT).

Picture of (equipment) a box and pole surrounded by snow.

 

Basic and applied geophysics research

 

Academic expertise from faculty at the college of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and the college of Engineering and Mines within the University of Alaska Fairbanks includes the solid Earth, atmosphere, cryosphere, oceans, remote sensing, unmanned aerial systems, and space.

 

Atmospheric Specifications and Propagation Predictions for 13 November 2014 Graph from Pavlof Volcano to DLL
Figure credit: Alex Iezzi, 2019

 

Education

 

Supporting DoD workforce development and training across the geophysical spectrum, through the college of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and the college of Engineering and Mines at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

 

Information on initiating a task order under the GDNP UARC.